The reaction between methane and chlorine in diffused sunlight is

A. Oxidation
B. Reduction
C. Polymerisation
D. Radical substitution

Check Answer

The correct answer is D. Radical substitution.
The reaction between methane (CH4) and chlorine (Cl2) in diffused sunlight is a type of radical substitution reaction, also known as a free-radical halogenation reaction. In this reaction, chlorine molecules are broken down into chlorine radicals (Cl*) by the energy from the sunlight. These radicals then react with methane molecules, producing hydrogen chloride (HCl) and a methyl radical (CH3*). The methyl radical can then react with another chlorine molecule, producing chloromethane (CH3Cl) and regenerating the chlorine radical, which can continue to react with more methane.
This type of reaction is important in organic chemistry because it is a common way to introduce halogens (like chlorine, bromine, or iodine) into organic molecules. It is also a key step in the industrial production of chloromethanes, which are used in the manufacturing of silicone polymers, refrigerants, and other chemicals.
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